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Philippine Mahogany
Philippine "Mahogany" (Shorea) is not a true Mahogany, in the botanical sense.  Like African "Mahogany", the marketing people decided that any perceived affiliation with genuine American Mahogany could only help sales.  There are several thousand islands in the area and there is a huge variety of trees with variations in density and color being sold as Philippine "Mahogany".  All have open pores and no distinct grain pattern.  They are generally light weight and not very hard. The wood is acceptable for furniture and cabinetry, but tends to be on the soft side for flooring.  The Philippine "Mahoganies" have little or no rot resistance so they are not recommended for exterior use. The darker varieties tend to be more resistant, though.  Some species have no distinct heart and sapwood, while other, darker variations do show this.

The United States has used Philippine Mahogany as a substitute for the darker genuine mahogany when a lighter color was desired for interior millwork, or when the budget was limited. In the case of limited budgets, Philippine Mahogany was stained darker to imitate the more expensive version.  Many Mid-century modern homes in San Antonio used Philippine mahogany for door skins and interior wall panelling, solid and plywood.
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Philippine Mahogany Showing Sapwood

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1930's Table Carved by JC Scholze in San Antonio

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#1 Fredericksburg Road at “Five Points” | P.O. Box 5398 | San Antonio, TX 78201 | T 210-736-3137 | F 210-736-3136